Category Archives: Artwork Installation

Hanging and Framing FAQs

I am often asked questions regarding the hanging and framing of 2-dimensional artworks.  So, I have written a new post answering a few Hanging & Framing FAQ’s.  As there are many easily accessible videos available on how to hang a work of art yourself, I thought it best to focus on things I have learned from experience that many of those videos do not cover.  Although hanging a medium-sized work of art on a plasterboard wall at eye level is not difficult, I advise that for safety, any installation that requires a ladder be turned over to professional installers.  I have included tips on what information to gather before you contact an installer that should save you time and money in the long run.

An image of a person on a ladder hanging artwork in a stairwell
Although an interesting design idea, and maybe the only place the owner of this house had to hang this suite of works, it presents a very dangerous hanging problem that needed to be addressed by a professional fine art services company, not the furniture mover. This fellow is lucky he did not leave with a broken leg and trail of shattered frames and artwork.

Framing and hanging FAQ’s:

  1. Why is there a paper or cardboard backing on many framed 2-D works?
  2. Is it better to use mirror hangers (D rings) or wire to hang a work?
  3. What type of hangers should be used to hang artworks on a sheetrock wall?
  4. Is there a standard height for hanging 2-D artwork?
  5. If I decide to use two hangers rather than one to affix a wired artwork because of weight, should I do anything different?
  6. After establishing one hook in the wall and realizing that the hook needs to go up a quarter of an inch, what should I do?
  7. Can a hook be reused, and if I have removed the hook for any reason, should I just put the same hook back into the hole it was removed from?
  8. How should I prepare before contacting a professional installer?
1. Why is there a paper or cardboard backing on many framed 2-D works?

When you pick up a newly framed work from your frame shop, you will normally find that there is a backing of some kind on the verso of the artwork.  For a framed work on paper, the backing will usually also be paper, and for a framed canvas the backing will likely be foam core or a fluted cardboard.

For a work on paper, the paper backing is there to keep dust and insects from getting into the back of the frame assembly.  Most people will hang the newly framed work on the wall for the next 20 years and the backing will do its job.  However, if you rotate art in your frames, having to remove the paper and the messy double stick tape residue that is left is a lot of work.  If you are planning on reusing a frame regularly, it is best to ask your framer not to put the backing material on that frame.  If brown Kraft paper is used to back an artwork, over many years, it will become brittle and actually break up rather than tear.  When this starts to happen, it is probably time to have a framer check to see if the frame, and the artwork, need attention.

Examples of Foamcore and fluted cardboard.
Foamcore on top and fluted cardboard below are the materials most used to protect the back of a painting on canvas.

For paintings on canvas, a backing material such as foamcore or brown fluted cardboard is normally used.  These materials not only keep bugs and dust out, but they also protect the back of the canvas while the work is in transit.  It helps to prevent a hit or poke to the canvas from behind, especially if the artwork will be moved around a lot.  The best material for backing a stretched canvas is acid-free fluted cardboard which is often gray in color.  Although foam core is often used, over time, the foam between the paper layers will start to degrade and it will not be as effective as it was when it was new.  Brown fluted cardboard has a very high acid content and, over the long term, can adversely affect anything it is adjacent to.

An image of a piece of acid free carboard.
The best material for backing a stretched canvas is acid-free fluted cardboard which is often gray in color.
2. Is it better to use mirror hangers (D rings) or wire to hang a work?

The answer is, it depends. Both types of hanging methods work but here are a few reasons why one would be preferred over the other.

Mirror hangers:

  • + Best method for a long-term installation
  • + Will keep the artwork level
  • + In most cases, will hold the artwork closer to the wall
  • + Automatically puts less stress on the hanger and  frame
a selection of mirror hangers.
This is a selection of mirror hangers (also called “D” rings) showing their different sizes and shapes.

Wire:

  • + Often better for short term installations or for works that will be moved frequently
  • + Minimum impact on the wall as often one hanger can be used rather than two that are far apart.
  • + Wire now comes plastic coated and will last longer
  • – Uncoated braided hanging wire can rust and break over time
  • – Wire is under constant tension and may break over time
  • – May not stay level requiring occasional adjustment
  • – keeps a constant inward strain on the frame
  • – If two hooks are used and not placed properly, a constant sideways torquing pressure could be exerted on each hook causing them to eventually fail.

Caution:   Before you hang a work with wire, here is an easy way to be sure that the wire will safely hold the weight of the artwork.

  1. Lift the artwork by its wire about an inch off the floor so you can feel the force that is needed to lift it.
  2. Set the work back on the floor gently maintaining the same level of force on the wire it took to lift it.
  3. Place your other hand on top of the picture holding it down to the floor.
  4. Pull up on the wire with about 25% more force than it took to get it off the ground.
  5. If the wire breaks or is pulled from either of the mirror hangers holding it in place, have your framer replace or reset the wire, or just remove the wire, reset the hangers so they are vertical, and hang it from the mirror hangers instead.

Since screw eyes are not normally used today, their use often indicates that the wire is older and needs to be replaced.  When replacing the wire, mirror hangers should be retrofitted for the screw eyes because, especially in the case of older frames, as the wood dries and looses density the screw eye will lose its purchase and eventually fail.

An image of an old and inadequate hanging system.
This image illustrates a disaster waiting to happen. It combines old picture wire improperly attached to the screw eye and improperly twisted around itself. It would require very little force to either pull the wire out of the screw eye or pull the screw eye out of the wood frame.
A proper wire attachment to a mirror hanger.
This is a proper wire attachment to a small mirror hanger.

Tips on How to carry artworks:  Always carry an artwork upright facing you, holding it with two hands from both sides.  It is not a good idea to carry it from the top of the frame, and it is best not to carry it around by its hanging wire if it has one.  You are making a lot of assumptions by doing so and you have much less control over the artwork.

Man carrying an artwork from the sides, not the top.
It is best to carry any artwork from the sides, not from the top. Holding it to one side when walking with it will allow better visibility and if you trip, a greater chance of not falling on top of the artwork.

 

3. What type of hangers should be used to hang artworks on a Sheetrock wall?

Although there are many hanging systems available on the market today for hanging 2-D artworks on a Sheetrock wall, for home use, most professional art installers use a floreat-style hanger.  This type of hanger was designed to exert minimal impact on the structure of the Sheetrock, yet securely hold the weight each hook is rated for.  Each thin nail is made of strong high-grade steel and after the hook is installed, the nail can be removed in most cases by twisting it while pulling it out with your fingertips.  The design of the hook forces the nail to maintain an angle of 65 degrees as it goes into the sheetrock.

This image shows the cross section of a Flourite style hanger in a 1/2 inch thick piece of Sheetrock.
This image shows the cross section of a Floreat style hanger in a 1/2 inch thick piece of Sheetrock.

This angle is maintained so that most of the nail’s length is held in the structure of the rock.  When a painting’s wire or mirror hanger is placed onto the hook, the weight of the artwork pulls the hanger down flat, clamping it against the wall.  This combination makes for a strong hanging system.

Series of picture hanging hooks.
This lineup of five Floreat hangers shows the size recommended for the weight of artwork. Starting from the left, they are 10, 20, 30, 50, and 75 pound hooks. I suggest choosing the next size up from the weight you believe the artwork to be. IE, If you think the weight of the artwork to be hung is 16 pounds, don’t use the 20 pound hook, use the 30 pound.

Floreat hangers come in five weight levels:  10, 20, and 30-pound hooks use one nail, 50-pound hooks use two nails and 75-pound hooks use three nails.  As a rule of thumb, I always try to use a hook that is one weight level above what I think will hold the artwork.  If the artwork weighs about 15 pounds, I will use a 30-pound hook, not a 20-pound hook etc.

4. Is there a standard height for hanging 2-D artwork?

Yes and No.  If you ask a museum installer or gallery owner at what height they prefer to hang in their spaces, they will provide you with a number between 57 and 62 inches that they, or their institution prefers.  This number refers to the height above the floor of the center line of each medium size artwork they hang.  It is determined by the height of the wall, the size of the space, and the height that is most comfortable for the average person to view the work. (whatever average is)

Consistency is actually more important than the height that is chosen.  That is, if you have determined a hanging height that is most comfortable for you to view artworks in your home, then use that height consistently throughout the room and preferably the entire house depending on each room’s ceiling height.  Imagine how a line of medium-sized artworks would look in a museum if they hung each one at a different center line height.

Image showing center line height of 60 inches on a group of hanging artworks.
The center line drawn across the four paintings above is 60 inches above the floor. Much larger artworks, depending on their scale, may need to be raised or lowered depending on the circumstance. The same goes for smaller works hung one above the other. The center line height is helpful when hanging a lot of works together, salon style, to be sure they will feel balanced on the wall.

These center line height numbers become irrelevant if a painting is too large to work with the center line height chosen for everything else, but the height at which a larger painting is hung needs to relate comfortably to what is around it.  And of course, this number is not helpful if you are hanging over furniture or a fireplace.

Tip:  Do not intentionally try to line up the top of larger artworks with the top of a door or window frame.  If it happens to line up because you are following an established center line height it is fine, but the room will feel a bit odd if works are hung a little high or low just to have them match another architectural feature that will create a visual line around the room.

5. If I decide to use two hangers rather than one to hang a wired artwork because of weight, should I do anything different?

I recommend that when using two hooks, especially two or three nail hooks, they be canted inward so that the weight of the wire does not put stress on the nails and hook when hung.  With one hook, because the wire forms a mountain shape, the weight vector is straight down.

Image showing how a wire looks when hung by single hook.
A single hook makes a mountain shape with the wire and exerts an even downward force on the hook.

With two hooks the wire forms a mesa shape and the direction of the weight vector can be as much as 20 degrees off the vertical.   If both hooks are nailed in vertically, as one would place a single hook.  When the weight of the artwork is placed on it, it will have a constant sideways pull possibly causing an eventual failure.

Showing a two hanger installation.
When two hooks are used, the wire makes the shape of a mesa, not a mountain. Note that when using two hooks, they are nailed into the wall so they cant in towards one another. This is so the force on each hook is balanced and equally downward like when a single hook is used. Otherwise, if hung strait down like a single hook, the wire would create a constant inward force twisting the nail and eventually weakening its connection to the wall.
6. After establishing one hook in the wall and discovering that the hook needs to go up a quarter of an inch, what should I do?

You can move the hook ¼ inch to the left, to the right, or below,  but do not move the hook ¼ inch up.  Since a hole was created in the Sheetrock from pounding the nail in for the first time, placing a nail ¼ inch above that hole means that the structure of the Sheetrock beneath the hook is now compromised and can fail.

If hanging the artwork from mirror hangers (D rings), move the hanger on the opposite side down ¼ inch to compensate.  If hanging the artwork from wire using one hook, remeasure, and use two hooks rather than one.  That will not only keep the artwork from eventually shifting out of level, it will double the amount of weight that can be held by just one hook.

7. Can a hook be reused, and if I have removed the hook for any reason, should I just put the same hook back into the hole it was removed from?

The answer to the first part of the question is yes, if the nail is not bent or damaged in any way.  The answer to the second part is more complicated.  Using the same hole in the Sheetrock again can be tricky if one is not experienced in hanging or working with Sheetrock.  If the hook fits snugly and the hook does not move around loosely in the hole, and the hook holds a lot more weight than the artwork that is to be rehung, you are probably fine.  If you are concerned, use the hook in a slightly different location or replace a one-nail hook with a two nail, or a two-nail with a three.

8. How should I prepare before contacting a professional installer?

It is always best to use a professional art installer to hang your art.   Most installers work by the hour and you can save money by telling them the size and approximate weight of each artwork you want hung, where it is to be placed, and the type of wall they will be hanging the artwork on.  With this information, they can work up a more accurate estimate, bring the appropriate manpower, and the proper hanging equipment for the project.  Photographs of the front and back of each artwork, including their frames, and area photographs of the rooms that include the walls where the artwork is to be installed will be helpful.

I hope you find some of these suggestions helpful.  If you have any other questions regarding the hanging, framing artwork, or anything else related to the art world, send an inquiry to info@fineartestates.com.

*****

Following are other FAE Blog Posts concerning the framing and safe handling of artworks.

An image of a painting carefully placed in the back seat of a carPractical Tips for Safely Transporting Artwork
An image of artworks carefully placed on on a bedTemporarily Storing Artwork: A Case Study
an image of a wall of shelves holding print boxesFour Artwork Storage Solutions

 

image of a wall of frame samplesThe Importance of a Proper Frame

 

an image of a graphic showing the entire spectrum of viable and non-visible lightWhen to Use UV Control Glazing
Two images showing an image of a flower behind reflective and reflection free glassReflection on the Problem of Reflections

 

To see all available FAE Design Blog Posts,  jump to the Design Blog Table of Contents.

To see all available FAE Collector Blog Posts, jump to the Collector Blog Table of Contents.

Sign up with FAE to receive our newsletter, and never miss a new blog post or update! 

Browse fine artworks available to purchase on FAE.  Follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter to stay updated about FAE and new blog posts.

For comments about this blog or suggestions for a future post, contact Madeleine at mbogan@fineartestates.com.

The FAE Design Blog Table of Contents:

As a service provided by FAE, the following informational posts cover a series of art related subjects, designed to demystify working with fine art, and tips on how best to use the FAE Website.  The FAE Design Blog table of Contents has been divided into the following categories:
  1. Most Recent Post

  2. Safe Handling of Artwork

  3. Artwork Installation

  4. Framing Artwork

  5. Fine Prints

  6. How to get the most out of the FAE Website

___________

1. Most Recent Post:

Hanging and Framing FAQ’s

 

 

2. Safe Handling of Artwork:

An image of a painting carefully placed in the back seat of a carPractical Tips for Safely Transporting Artwork
An image of artworks carefully placed on on a bedTemporarily Storing Artwork: A Case Study
an image of a wall of shelves holding print boxesFour Artwork Storage Solutions

 

 

3. Artwork Installation:

outdoor image of a line of figure sculptures with arms raisedSiting Sculpture, Part One: Overview

 

facade of a modern house with a round sculpture sited in the front yardSiting Sculpture: Part Two, A Case Study

 

4. Framing Artwork:

image of a wall of frame samplesThe Importance of a Proper Frame

 

an image of a graphic showing the entire spectrum of viable and non-visible lightWhen to Use UV Control Glazing
Two images showing an image of a flower behind reflective and reflection free glassReflection on the Problem of Reflections

 

5. Fine Pints:

a panoramic image of the press room of a fine art publisherThe Value in Fine and Reproductive Prints
an image showing the print and print edition numberWhat Does That Fraction Mean on a Fine Print?

 

6. How to get the most out of the FAE website:

An image of the entrance to the Valley House Gallery Sculpture GardenWelcome to FAE!
See art on your wall with the app.Announcing the FAE App, now available from iTunes!
Image showing the FAE app on the apple App StoreWill It Work in My Space?

 

Composite image showing how a presentation can be made from FAE dataAnatomy of a View

 

Image showing painting over fireplaceCreating Stunning Presentations with FAE

 

 

*****

To see all available FAE Collector Blog Posts, jump to the Collector Blog Table of Contents.

Sign up with FAE to receive our newsletter, and never miss a new blog post or update! 

Browse fine artworks available to purchase on FAE.  Follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter to stay updated about FAE and new blog posts.

For comments about this blog or suggestions for a future post, contact Madeleine at mbogan@fineartestates.com.

Siting Sculpture: Part Two, A Case Study

Properly siting sculpture outdoors is a process that requires many considerations.  In this Case Study,  I will introduce 8 categories of issues that may, or may not affect the decision on where and how an artwork is to be placed.  As most every artwork is different, each category will play a greater or lesser role in this process.

My stepmother Erika Farkac ran the Design Department of Lambert Landscape Company, once considered the finest landscaping company in Texas, for over 20 years and then worked independently for another 22.  She once told me that in every garden design she created while at Lambert’s, she always included a space for a properly sited sculpture.  She also said that only about one in a hundred design clients actually used that space for a sculpture, other than occasionally installing a fountain or something in concrete.  So, when a client used the space she provided for a sculpture, to her, it was a small victory.

Lambert Landscaping Company at their Bachman Lake offices in North Dallas, circa 1950

Siting / Lighting / Surroundings | Environment / Security / Safety / Maintenance / Disaster 

As I did in Siting Sculpture, Part One, I have listed 8 categories to think about when deciding where to place a sculpture.  Each can affect the viewer or the sculpture itself and all will affect every artwork installation in varying degrees.  And by making sure that one of the categories is as good as it can be under the circumstances, this may necessitate paying more attention to the others.  It is really about finding the best balance of the most important categories for each situation.

For example, a 5-inch-tall sculpture made of plastic that is sitting on a 40-inch stand against a wall may not be much of a safety risk in a home, but in a public place, it is a huge security risk.  A 5-ton piece of steel with sharp edges and no barriers around it sitting in a retail mall hallway may not be a security risk, but it is a huge safety risk for those who may accidentally collide with it.  Awareness and thinking through all the issues is what makes for a sculpture’s best overall placement.

Most Designers will be thinking primarily about the first three categories on the list as they deal mostly with aesthetics.  The other categories are more practical in nature and the ask is: “By placing a sculpture here, what can, and what will happen to it over time.”

Bronze sculpture interestingly sited in front of a modernist house.

As an example, I will use an image from the first blog of an outdoor sculpture, sited in front of a modern house, to discuss how each of the categories apply or why they are not overly important in this circumstance.

First off, I have to say I really like the concept of putting a large round bronze sculpture in front of this modern home that is all about rectilinear form.  Although it stands alone as a sculpture, it more importantly acts as a foil for the hard edges of the building behind while adding an appropriate shape to the building’s geometry.

Showing how the sculpture is sited in the front yard where it appears to be balancing on its edge.

Siting:

As you can see, the owners of this house decided to site the sculpture in the front yard.  They lined it up with the front window of the house so it could be easily seen from inside, and the other side could be seen from the street with the house as a backdrop.

It was also installed to sit in the grass with its supporting base hidden below ground.  By doing this, to an observer, the sculpture appears to be balancing miraculously on its edge.  One of the best street views is where the photograph above is taken because of the square section of the house that serves as a background here.

The wall to the left of the large window is also a nice background.   It would be seen behind the sculpture as a visitor walks down the portico to the front door.  As the viewer heads towards the door, a kinetic illusion is created as the sculpture appears to roll away and get bigger in relation to the long wall behind it.

This unfortunate effort to light the sculpture not only interferes with the aesthetics of the sculpture’s placement, it will be a hindrance for those who want to see the sculpture through the widow at night.

Lighting:

Three lighting fixtures were arranged in a row to light the street side of the artwork.  They were placed above ground and their color was chosen to blend in with the artwork.   With this installation, I would have recommended that the lights be recessed into the ground and that there be three more lights on the backside so the work could be seen at night from the house.

Because the three existing fixtures were placed above ground and focused up and slightly back to illuminate the street side of the sculpture properly, anyone looking out the window at night will see nothing but shadow and glare from the lights on the street side of the sculpture.  There would be no glare from any of the lights and the sculpture would be well lit if all the lights had been installed below ground level.

Surroundings:

The surroundings for this sculpture are very good.  During the day, nothing is obstructing the view of the sculpture and it is easily visible  from all directions.  Because there are no paths to, or near the sculpture, the closest view is from the portico unless you venture off into the yard.  The sculpture appears isolated, floating in the front yard’s sea of green grass.  The only oddness is the three lights poking up, interrupting the space around the sculpture.

A perfect place to mimic Leonardo da Vinci’s “Vitruvian Man” for an Instagram post.

Since there are no barriers, it can be approached by animals looking for a place to mark or relieve themselves, or humans that want to get a closer look who will unintentionally wear paths in the grass.  This type of sculpture, sited in a location like this, is what I call “Selfie Bait.”  With no barriers for protection, it is an open invitation for people to climb inside the ring to mimic Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man for an Instagram post.

Environment:

This artwork will be in full sun most of the day and will be exposed to all the elements the weather can throw at it.  Over time, if it is a waxed bronze, left alone, its brown patina will slowly turn green.

Security:

Most people would be concerned that an artwork in such a public space would be stolen.  This is always a possibility, but if it’s insured, I would not be overly concerned.  The pleasure of living with it and sharing it with my neighbors would trump my concerns if it was mine.  There is also the possibility of vandalism, or even neighborhood kids, flying drones through it or using it as a target for any number of ball games.

Safety:

Because of the hazards and inconsiderate people mentioned above, the connection between the base and the sculpture itself needs to be strong enough to have a 200 plus pound person climb and swing from it.  The area of the base itself needs to be large and heavy enough to withstand this kind of abuse.  You don’t want a child to get hurt because it fell on them.  It is also a good idea to check that your liability insurance is paid up.

Wait till the weed whackers start to do a number on the sculpture’s patina and the lights.

Maintenance:

Most every sculpture, especially those placed outside, will need occasional maintenance.  In this case, a bronze sculpture with this level of exposure to the elements would need to be washed off and waxed at least once a year to maintain its patination.  As mentioned earlier, depending on the composition of the bronze used, it will start turning green fairly quickly when the wax has been worn off by the elements.

The idea of having the siting of this sculpture create the illusion that it is balanced on its edge is conceptually appealing.  However, having it, or any artwork for that matter, sit directly on grass is a maintenance nightmare unless you have your own private gardener who is willing to hand clip the grass around it once a week during the growing season, or you are willing to do it yourself.  In time, a maintenance crew, that may change from week to week, with weed whackers can do serious damage to both the artwork and the lights next to it.

I would have recommended that they skip the idea of balancing the work on the grass and set the work on a brick or concrete base that would accommodate the lights inside it.  This way, it would be easy to keep the grass trimmed and the work would not be accidentally damaged by the landscaping crews in the process.

A less expensive option would have been to place the artwork in a bed of ground cover.  This maintains a natural setting for the sculpture but protects it from most types of mechanical damage.  And if the ground cover was cactus, it would keep unwanted intruders away, but unfortunately, make that yearly waxing a challenge.

Disaster:

The design of this sculpture, and where it is sited, make it immune to most types of natural or man-caused disasters.  In its current location, high winds and lightning are its most likely issues but in Dallas, Texas, fire, earthquake, and flood are probably not going to be issues.  Because this sculpture has very little surface area for its size, high winds are probably not going to be an issue outside of a direct hit by a F5 tornado and there would be a low risk of a lightning strike.  It is actually more likely, that this sculpture will be hit by an out of control automobile than be damaged by any of these other issues, but it is a good idea to think through what could happen for each proposed location.

As it was with my stepmother, I am also pleased to see a house where sculpture has become part of the landscape plan, especially when a work is shared with the community by being placed in a front yard.  This is a brave and possibly dangerous act, however.  The neighbors probably don’t care about the house next door having a sculpture in their back yard where it is not on public view, but they may not like the fact that their neighbor has decided to impose their taste on them by placing a sculpture in their front yard, where it is visible to all who pass by.  It is not a bad idea to keep the neighbors in the loop if you feel the sculpture you are planning to put in a publicly viewed space might be controversial.

If you are not comfortable placing sculpture yourself, be sure to enlist the help of a professional art installation company to work with you to site the piece properly.  Many of these companies employ artists and they will be sensitive to your needs and the needs of the work.   It is not a bad idea to run through the list of items above with installers to be sure that all the issues are considered before a placement is finalized.

*****

For more information about Artwork Installation, visit this other blog post:

outdoor image of a line of figure sculptures with arms raisedSiting Sculpture, Part One: Overview

 

Hanging and Framing FAQ’s

 

 

To see all available FAE Design Blog Posts,  jump to the Design Blog Table of Contents.

To see all available FAE Collector Blog Posts, jump to the Collector Blog Table of Contents.

Sign up with FAE to receive our newsletter, and never miss a new blog post or update! 

Browse fine artworks available to purchase on FAE.  Follow us on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter to stay updated about FAE and new blog posts.

For comments about this blog or suggestions for a future post, contact Madeleine at mbogan@fineartestates.com.

Siting Sculpture, Part One: Overview

I have been an art dealer now for over 45 years who has been privileged to live and work in a 4-acre sculpture garden, envisioned by my parents, Donald and Margaret Vogel in 1959.  As most of the artwork in the garden is consigned by artists and is for sale, it changes with some regularity.  As new work arrives decisions must be made as to each sculpture’s siting, presentation, and other important considerations.
Entrance to the Valley House Gallery Sculpture Garden

The garden is modern and informal with winding paths, a large pond, and is normally accessible to the public when the gallery is open.  Exhibitions of sculpture in the gallery often extend out into the garden.  Although for sale, sculptures in the garden are not labeled or priced, and are intentionally installed to look like they were placed permanently.

Sculpture in ground cover or flower beds requires less maintenance than sculpture surrounded by grass that must be mowed and edged regularly.

I am betting that for your residential clients you are rarely asked to help with sculpture placement indoors, and almost never outdoors.  Unless it is already owned, sculpture is not normally thought of until all the two-dimensional works have been placed on the walls of a home or office.

Among other posts, I will be writing a series of articles related to sculpture placement both inside and outside the home and office, covering tips and ideas that might be useful to you when helping your clients place sculpture.  Although some issues are unique to location, many considerations are the same and can be applied accordingly.  Below are a few of the things to consider when placing sculpture.

Accessibility:

After determining a likely location for a sculpture, look for any unacceptable physical barriers or impeded sight-lines that obstruct access to the artwork.

This sculpture is used as a focal point at the end of a long hallway. It is placed outside the home in front of a brick wall and framed by a large picture window at the hallway’s end. Although its placement does not allow the work to be viewed from any other angle but the front, it is given an exceptionally prominent spot where it can be viewed by anyone moving about the first floor of the home.

Siting:

This category encompasses the sculptures physical placement in a space and how it relates to everything around it.

Lighting:

This category involves every aspect of how the sculpture is either mechanically and/or naturally lit, 24/7.

Surroundings:

After determining a likely location for a sculpture, this category involves considering everything around the sculpture, both physical and visual, and how it might affect all the other categories now and in the future.

This sculpture is in the front privacy courtyard and is protected from view by a privacy wall and entrance gate. It can not only be seen by every visitor as they come and go, but also from the windows of the living room and the master bath bathtub window seen at the far back.  It very nicely serves as a foil to the linear aspects of the rest of the entrance.

Security:

After determining a probable location for a sculpture, what is the perceived risk it will be stolen, vandalized, or toppled over by some force of nature?

Although I am a big fan of people sharing their art by placing it in their front yards where everyone passing by can see it, today, this work is an open invitation for people to climb inside to mimic Leonardo da Vinci’s “Vitruvian Man” for an Instagram posting. There are lighting, maintenance, and liability issues with this installation I will explore in another post.

Safety:

After determining a probable location for a sculpture, is there anything about its location or stability that could cause harm to someone?

Although these plastic ice cubes floating in a swimming pool is a wonderful novel idea for a wild party, as a long term installation, it is a nightmare.

Maintenance:

After determining a probable location for a sculpture, beyond what would normally be needed to maintain the sculpture in general, it is important to determine if there are any additional maintenance issues created by siting the work in that location.

Disaster:

For any location a sculpture is sited, it is wise to take a moment and think about the area and what types of geophysical or weather related worse-case scenarios might affect the sculpture.  If there is a potential problem, planning ahead for an event can minimize possible damage if one is forewarned.

Environmental:

For any location a sculpture is sited, are there any environmental issues such as direct sunlight, excessive moisture, extreme variations in temperature, or acid rain that needs to be considered?

In this series of articles, each of the above topics will be addressed regarding the proper placement of sculpture in both indoor and outdoor settings.  I hope that forwarding my experiences with all types of sculpture installation will help you to more easily handle the issues faced when a design client wants to add sculpture to their art collection.

I am always available to discuss questions that may arise with sculpture placement.  Just send an email with images attached of the sculpture and where you would like to place the work along with your phone number and I will get back to you as soon as I can.  I may not always have a solution, but I bet I will be able to help you ask good questions.

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For more information about Artwork Installation, visit this other blog post:

facade of a modern house with a round sculpture sited in the front yardSiting Sculpture: Part Two, A Case Study

 

Hanging and Framing FAQ’s

 

 

Hanging and  Framing FAQs

 

 

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To see all available FAE Collector Blog Posts, jump to the Collector Blog Table of Contents.

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For comments about this blog or suggestions for a future post, contact Madeleine at mbogan@fineartestates.com.